November 30, 2022

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Now you can hear your voice on Mars

Now you can hear your voice on Mars

in the space, people actually maybe Hear you scream (or sing)it turns out.

Groundbreaking data collected by NASA’s Perseverance rover is able to replicate the voice of people on Mars compared to Earth.

The space agency even boasts an online tool that allows Earthlings to simulate how they sound on the Red Planet from the comfort of our homes.

That’s right: You can drop your Mars bars on an interstellar karaoke tour.

To use it, just go to Mars voices section On the NASA website, go to Tab “You are on Mars”then “Click and hold the button to record your welcome” depending on the site.

Finally, download the audio file to hear what you sound like on Mars. Having tested the job ourselves, The Post can safely say that those tin cans we talked to when we were kids to repeat “Martian talk” weren’t too far off.

NASA boasts an online tool that allows Earthlings to simulate our voice on the Red Planet from the comfort of our homes.
NASA

“If you were standing on Mars, you would hear a much quieter and muffled sound than what you hear on Earth, and you would wait a little longer to hear it,” They wrote NASA on their site. “Some sounds we are accustomed to on Earth, such as whistles, bells, or birdsong, are almost inaudible on Mars.”

The results were part of a paranormal study that calculated the speed of sound on the Red Planet.

To measure the speed of sound on the planet, the Perseverance rover fired a laser at a rock and recorded the noise it made upon impact, according to results revealed at the 53rd Congress of Lunar and Planetary Sciences.

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Groundbreaking data collected by NASA's Perseverance Rover is able to replicate the voice of people on Mars compared to Earth.
Groundbreaking data collected by NASA’s Perseverance rover is able to replicate the voice of people on Mars compared to Earth.
New York Post photomontage

The researchers then measured the laser’s firing time against the time the sound reached the recording device and compared it to the acoustic data at the Earth’s surface. They recorded a supersonic speed of Mars at 540 miles per hour, compared to 760 miles per hour on our planet. This discrepancy is attributed to the fact that the atmosphere on Mars is “completely different,” which affects the way we perceive sound.

And while we’re not actually able to test our voices on Mars itself – At least until 2026 anyway – Astronauts in an armchair are also invited to use the Mars Sounds instrument to test the range of others Earth sounds might sound On the fourth rock from the sun. These include ocean waves, bicycle bells, city noises, the classic piano number Claire de Lune and even Neil Armstrong’s famous “One Small Step Man” speech after his historic moon landing.

That’s right, you can hear someone’s voice on the moon… on Mars.

"If you were standing on Mars, you would hear a much quieter and muffled sound than you would on Earth, and you would wait a little longer to hear it," They wrote NASA on their site.
“If you were standing on Mars, you would hear much quieter and more muffled sound than what you hear on Earth, and you would wait a little longer to hear it,” NASA wrote on its site.
NASA

Location It also features many recordings that are distinguished by perseverance She was picked up during her fact-finding missions, including robotic driving, a laser that “zaps” a rock and even a helicopter flying over the planet.

In general, most of them appeared quieter and more muted than they do on Earth, which NASA compensated for with “very different temperature, density, and chemistry of the cochineal space rock,” the researchers wrote.

“The volume you hear will automatically decrease on the surface of Mars,” the results continued. “The atmosphere of Mars is about 100 times less dense than the atmosphere on Earth – which means there is very little of it.

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NASA concluded that “the atmosphere of Mars, made up of 96% carbon dioxide, would absorb a lot of high-intensity sounds, so only low-intensity sounds would travel long distances.”

In addition, the sounds would take longer to reach one’s ear due to the frigid Martian surface temperatures, which average about -81 degrees Fahrenheit.

"The volume you hear will automatically decrease on the surface of Mars," Researchers wrote.
“The volume you hear will automatically decrease on the surface of Mars,” the researchers wrote.
NASA