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Imran Khan, Pakistan's prime minister, removed in parliament vote of no-confidence

Imran Khan, Pakistan’s prime minister, removed in parliament vote of no-confidence

A shop owner adjusts a TV screen to watch a speech by Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan, at his shop in Islamabad, Pakistan, March 31, 2022. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

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ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – Pakistan’s lower house speaker said Imran Khan lost a vote of confidence in parliament on Sunday after letting go of coalition partners who blame him for a deteriorating economy and failing to deliver on his election promises. .

The announcement of the vote result before 0100 (2000 GMT) came after multiple delays in the House of Representatives due to members of Khan’s party, who said there was a foreign plot to oust the cricket star-turned-politician.

House Speaker Ayaz Sadiq said the opposition parties managed to get 174 votes in the 342-member House of Representatives to support the motion of no-confidence, which made it a majority vote. There were only a few lawmakers from Khan’s ruling party present for the vote.

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Two sources said the vote came after the country’s powerful army chief, General Qamar Javed Bajwa, met with Khan, with criticism mounting over the delay in the parliamentary process.

Opposition leader Shahbaz Sharif is the favorite to lead the nuclear-armed nation of 220 million people, where the military has ruled for half its history. Read more

Shahbaz, 70, younger brother of three-time Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, is known to be an effective administrator.

Khan, 69, rose to power in 2018 with the support of the military, but recently lost his parliamentary majority when allies withdrew from his coalition government. Analysts said there were also indications that he had lost the support of the military.

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Opposition parties say he has failed to revive the economy hit by COVID-19 or deliver on his promises to make Pakistan a corruption-free and prosperous country that is respected on the world stage.

His ouster expands Pakistan’s unwelcome record of political instability: No prime minister has completed his full term since independence in 1947, although Khan is the first to be removed by a vote of no confidence.

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(Covering) By Asif Shehzad, Syed Reza Hasan and Jariban Nayyar Bashimam in Islamabad; Writing by Sanjeev Migliani; Editing by William Mallard, Jean Harvey and Jonathan Otis

Our criteria: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.