December 4, 2022

Great Indian Mutiny

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Heavy rains kill at least 74 in India and Bangladesh Community | USA Edition

At least 74 people have been killed and millions more injured in heavy rains that have lashed northern India and neighboring Bangladesh for more than a week, with rescue teams continuing to evacuate dangerous people from the floods.

In the northern Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh, at least eight people have died since the onset of heavy rains ten days ago, Babang Dingkong, deputy director of the region’s state disaster management authority, told Efe on Monday.

For its part, the State Disaster Management Authority of Assam’s Northeast Region (ASDMA) recorded 23 deaths, six of which had been raining since mid-May, in its latest bulletin.

In addition, the ASDMA said nearly 800,000 people and 270,000 animals were affected by the rains, which established more than 420 shelters and relief centers in more than 2,000 cities in 22 districts of Assam.

A further 33 people were killed in 16 districts in Bihar’s north Indian state due to thunder and lightning, state government chief Nitish Kumar said on Friday.

The Indian Meteorological Department has warned of thundershowers in at least five parts of northern India except New Delhi in the next 24 hours, with heavy winds and heavy rains this morning causing heavy flooding and felling of trees. Roads.

Bangladesh

For its part, recent heavy rains in neighboring Bangladesh have killed at least 10 people and evacuated 10,000 more to shelters, Sylhet city executive chairman Mosharraf Hossain told Efe on Monday. Affected by floods.

Authorities estimate that more than two million people have been affected by the heavy rains, although “the flood situation is improving a bit now,” he said, adding that the country’s two main rivers, the Surma and the Kushiyara, are still flowing beyond the danger level.

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These weather events are common in South Asia during the rainy season, usually between May and September, when hundreds of deaths and millions of people are affected.